Playback: Genealogies of Interactivity

October 9-11, 2019, Concordia University

Use, re-use, engagement, creation, distraction, immersion, seduction, play, critique—media and culture consist of practices that shape experience, meaning, and communities. The basic dynamism of media present and past, though, is not always accommodated in our critical, theoretical, and scholarly approaches. We need critical explorations that recognize and assess media and their full cultural complexities in history and across contexts. This includes examinations of both minor and major media forms and formats, and their specific iterations and uses as content, event, institution and apparatus.

This symposium brings scholars from Concordia University together with students and faculty from the Institute for Theatre, Film, and Media Studies at Goethe University (Frankfurt, Germany) to explore the complexities of our media and cultural histories.

Symposium Hosts:

Communication Studies, Faculty of Arts and ScienceFilm Studies, Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema, Faculty of Fine Arts

In association with the Media History Research Centre, Concordia University and Graduiertenkolleg “Configurations of Film,” Goethe University

For more information on the symposium, presenters, and schedule, please visit our event page at: http://www.concordia.ca/events/genealogies-of-interactivity.html

Introducing The Residual Media Depot


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“This is not a media archaeology lab. This is not an archive. This is a research collection.”

Wershler introduces the  Residual Media Depot in Milieux Institute‘s Pause Button zine. The Media History Research Centre director recently launched the research collection, primarily composed of early video game consoles. Naming the collection proved more difficult than anticipated. In his article, Weshler carefully considers terms such as archive and media archaeology lab in his search for the perfect name. What is it? http://ow.ly/yDVP306S8Ni

What makes a space a milieu?

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What makes a space a milieu? How are they formed and what do they promise to create?

MHRC Coordinator Elise Cotter is featured in Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture and Technology at Concordia University’s Pause Button. The online zine hopes to disseminate the research, ideas, prototypes and discoveries that come in and out of Milieux to the wider public. As Director, Bart Simon exclaims, it is “a renewal of the idea of the public university and of the desire to be public.”

“Messages, Medium, Milieux” looks at the often forgotten bond between media & geography. The article was inspired by media historian, John Durham Peters’ recent visit to Concordia University as a guest speaker for the Media History Research Centre.

Read the article here: http://ow.ly/4SmX306OQVZ