RESCHEDULED The Special Effects Business Is An Oxymoron: An Historical Perspective

FURY ROAD

Who makes the visual effects for contemporary blockbusters?

Employing analyses of industry discourse and global media structures, this talk reveals the historical traces of the smooth corporate rhetoric of “convergence,” “cooperation” and “synergy” that has led to a destabilization in the aesthetic, technology, and labor of these big-budget films.

Friday, November 20 | 1 PM
CJ 1.114  | Communication & Journalism Building
Loyola Campus, Concordia University,  7141 rue Sherbrooke Ouest

Julie Turnock is Assistant Professor of Media and Cinema Studies at the University of Illinois. She is the author of Plastic Reality: Special Effects, Art and Technology in 1970s US Filmmaking (Columbia UP) and has published research on the history of special effects and on digital cinema.

Can’t make it? Follow us at @MHRCCONCORDIA and follow the #MHRCTALKS hashtag as we live tweet the event.

MHRC asks, what is a Media Lab?

A conversation with Jussi Parikka, Lori Emerson, and Darren Wershler

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Where did media labs come from and why do they occupy such an important role in contemporary discourse? What are practices and places in which media theory is produced? In the context of the humanities, why “lab,” and what sorts of claims follow from the use of this term? What are the “other places” of pedagogy in the era of networked digital media? How are media labs part of the specific institutional situation of the corporate university?
Join Jussi Parikka, Lori Emerson and Darren Wershler for a conversation on these questions, in the context of their new research project, THE LAB BOOK: SITUATED PRACTICES IN MEDIA STUDIES.

WHAT IS A MEDIA LAB? A CONVERSATION
Thursday, November 5 | 4:15-6 PM
CJ 1.114 | Communication and Journalism Building
Loyola Campus, Concordia University,
7141 rue Sherbrooke Ouest

Can’t make it? Follow us at @mhrcconcordia as we live tweet the event.

REIMAGINING CINEMA: FILM AT EXPO 67

Media History Research Centre presents Reimagining Cinema: Film at Expo 67 

A roundtable discussion in response to the publication of “Reimagining Cinema: Film at Expo 67,” edited by Monika Kin Gagnon and Janine Marchessault.

Scott MacKenzie from Queen’s University and Inderbir Singh Riar from Carleton University will join Concordia University’s Monika Kin Gagnon, Haidee Wasson, as well as moderator, Jeremy Stolow.

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Join us!
Wednesday, October 28
4:30 to 6:00 PM
RF 110,
Jesuit Conference Centre,
Loyola Campus,
Concordia University,
7141 rue Sherbrooke O.

Can’t make it? Follow us at @mhrcconcordia as we live tweet the event.

DIGITAL HUMANITIES: FROM SPECULATIVE TO SKEPTICAL

MEDIA HISTORY RESEARCH CENTRE PRESENTS THE PROJECT ARCLIGHT TALK, DIGITAL HUMANITIES: FROM SPECULATIVE TO SKEPTICAL.

On Friday, October 9, Concordia University will welcome Johanna Drucker to lead a “skeptical” talk on the foundation, development and future of the Digital Humanities field.

After two decades of growing investment in tools, platforms, projects, pedagogy, and promotional campaigns, the challenge to Digital Humanities as a field is whether or not any of this activity has had an intellectual impact on any specific field or discipline.

Johanna Drucker will take us through the methodological foundations of Digital Humanities, its development, and accomplishments, but will also pose a series of questions about what the future should or might look like, and whether there is an intellectual future for this field.

Johanna Drucker is the Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies in the Department of Information Studies at UCLA. She was the co-founder of the Speculative Computing Lab, with Jerome McGann, at the University of Virginia, and has published widely on topics related to digitalscholarship, pedagogy, and criticism, including SpecLab (Chicago, 2008) the jointly authored Digital_Humanities, with Anne Burdick. Peter Lunenfeld, Todd Presner, and Jeffrey Schnapp, (MIT, 2013). Her introductory coursebook, DH_101 Introduction to Digital Humanities, is freely available online.

Event Details:

Friday, October 9 | 3:30 PM
CJ 1.114 Communication and Journalism Building
Loyola Campus, Concordia University
7141 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal